Take your Alfresco productivity to the next level with the Alfresco SDK 2.1.0

As a first tangible result (first relase out!) in my new role in Alfresco Product Management and of the renewed investment Alfresco is putting in the developer platform, developer services and communications, no more than 5 months later than the 2.0.0 release, I am pleased to announce that the Alfresco SDK 2.1.0 is now released and available in Maven Central.

Many thanks go to Martin, for bringing new life to the Alfresco Developer Platform team and to Ole for stepping above and beyond his Developer Evangelist role and help tie up the release. Kudos also to Community members like Bindu who helped with testing and feedback.

This release works for Community and Enterprise (fully supported by Alfresco) and it shows strong signs of our cross-department (Dev, Product, Docs, Support) effort on a much more seamless and productive developer experience for our beloved ecosystem out there.

Here are the full release notes, but let me give you a couple of highlights:

  1. First off, building on the SDK 2.0.0 Spring Loaded approach, we have completed the effort for a full hot reloading experience, both for Alfresco and Share. Until more fixes go in product, we have introduced for this purpose a couple of plugin goals in the alfresco-maven-plugin, which are automatically invoked (or you can manually do that) to refresh webscripts on Alfresco and Share. If you are using your Eclipse, this should happen automatically on save, for IDEA you might night a bit of manual configuration. See RAD (Rapid Application Development) documentation for details.
  2. The SDK now supports Solr4 in the All-in-One archetype: this was the top-most requested issue in 2.0.0, so I am glad we got that out!
  3. In an effort to deliver higher and higher quality extension, we have introduced support for functional and regression testing, leveraging the Selenium based share-po library, which we use internally at Alfresco to perform black box testing. For details, here’s the issue and command details on how to regression test your customizations.
  4. Thanks to Martin and the Docs team  have fully re-written and improved documentation for the SDK 2.1.0  and we also started properly versioning docs for all SDK supported versions (e.g. see 2.0.0 docs)
  5. The SDK is an officially supported Alfresco product as of 1.1.1, but the SDK 2.1.0 marks an important step towards a much more predictable, supported, sustainable development support on the SDK. From now on, you can check the Product Support Status to verify the support status of the SDK and also, if you are an Enterprise customer, engage with Developer Support to get Dev savvy engineering help you on Development matters

I do hope you guys enjoy the new SDK and I am eager to collect feedback, via comments to this post, forums or you can reach out to me or Ole, as well as raise issues in the SDK project.

Handing my baby, the SDK, off 🙂

One more service announcement: as followers of this blog, you know I have always used this channel to announce SDK news and releases. While I’ll keep posting on SDK usage tips and more in general on my visions on the Alfresco Developer Platform directions, I think it’s time to hand off the baby and in line with the full Alfresco (“the company”) support for the SDK, move all communications to the Alfresco Developer Blog.

In particular, our Developer Evangelist is going to play a key role in keeping you updated and collecting feedback on our development experience.

So stay tuned on our Dev Blog, as Ole will soon post a more comprehensive update on this release.

Is Open Source the right model in the Cloud Rush era?

I finally found the time to share the slides for the ApacheCon talk I gave a couple of weeks ago in Austin, Tx.

The topic is pretty ambitious and quite business oriented, although the most technical in my audience will still appreciate the details around how Open Source technologies are powering the Cloud world, and how the DevOps movement is entrenched in strong open source cultural roots.

I hope you’ll take the time to read the preso below and I’d love to hear your feedback below, since I imagine there would be some heated disagreement 🙂

But if you are too lazy even for checking the slides below, here’s the 3 key take-aways from that preso:

1. It’s not Open Source vs. Cloud, it’s Open Source + Cloud, in the way that there would not be Cloud without the economies of scale provided by Open Source and that most SaaS companies are increasingly seeing the value of Open Source contributions (Google, Linkedin, Facebook and the likes are by no chance the biggest contributors)

2. Open Source has won, and it’s no more a positive differentiation (positive incentive) but more like a de facto standard for writing code (especially at infrastructure level), so it’s a negative differentiation (negative incentive) not to be Open Source (e.g. Govmts around the world use increasingly open source first policies in their software provisioning processes). In a way, Open Source is a commodity.

3. There will not be another RedHat, i.e. a $1B company only based on support and services of pure Open Source software. Sure, Hortonworks and the likes can still make a few hundred millions, but the growing technical and market expertise (due to the commoditization) around Open Source will reduce their chances to do a pure open source services play. Furthermore, we see more and more examples of the winning pattern being running a SaaS service and contribute (at least most of) code to the Open Source: this allows you to scale in the cloud and leverage the profitable SaaS business model, while de-risking investments and creating de facto standards by contributing and  leveraging the Open Source ecosystem.